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I have search/scour the net and came up with the following:

The location #56 (starter relay) in the fuse box have been replaced with a "NoStart" relay that I need to use the FOB to click on to start my car with key in the ignition.

My 2003 Ford Explorer seems to start falling apart and the FOB is getting unreliable to allow me to start my car after 1 click, i have to click several times to get it going. Yes, I did replace the battery - I believe the FOB electronics is getting worn out. I don't have $$$ to have additional FOBs made or serviced by the "professional dealer".

I want to remove the NoStart from Dynamco from my vehicle, but when I removed the NoStart Relay from #56 - I can't start my car.

Where or what is the item number from AutoZone or Advance Auto or ORelly's to replace the Dynamco unit with an actual starter relay switch in the #56 fuse spot location.

I appreciate anyone help on this matter.

Have a great weekend...

Gil in NC.
 

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Right next to that relay should be an identical relay to the original (unless it was replaced due to failure at some point in the past) which you should be able to get a part # or at least electrical specs from, but really it's a 30A/40A size so I just mean you can pull it and see the blade configuration it uses.

You didn't mention which engine, so I just glanced at one of them for the junction box under the hood. There may be 3 large (full sized) relays in a row. The middle is starter, on the shorter side of the box is blower relay - you can turn key accessory position on so the blower is blowing, then pull the relay to confirm it is the blower relay. The other side has the PCM relay, which you need to keep plugged in. See the picture halfway down the following page:
http://www.justanswer.com/ford/5mn7g-ford-explorer-4x4-2003-ford-explorer-won-t-start-new.html

If yours uses a different junction box, locate the diagram for that year/engine junction box and it should label which are starter and blower relays.

Anyway, swap the blower relay into the starter relay position to confirm that the vehicle starts using it. You do not need to put the security system relay into the blower relay position.

It probably has a standard blade pinout config and rated for something like 30A or 40A. Various manufacturers have different part #s for it, but you should be able to go to one of those parts stores, with the blower motor relay in hand, and they can get a standard replacement for about $10, or tell them it's the starter relay and if they can only find a starter solenoid for that part lookup, have them pull a blower relay instead.

Similarly you can lookup blower relay on those parts stores' website and compare the bottom electrical blade configuration to the one you already have plugged in.

However if the security key fob has the type of switch that is a silicone rubber dome over a switch contact that's just carbonized or gold plated traces on a circuit board, you may be able to disassemble the fob and scrub the silicon dome with strong detergent solution and rub the circuit board contact with a dry paper towel to get the typical silicone oil contamination off of both pieces for better electrical contact.

If it is instead a modular switch mechanism soldered onto the circuit board, soldering a new switch mechanism might work. You could trace the circuit and use a multimeter in continuity measurement mode on the appropriate switch pins to see if the switch is completing the circuit or not. That is if you can solder, as a replacement switch shouldn't cost more than a buck or two plus a couple bucks shipping from Digikey.
 
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