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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went to autozone to check out what is up with my CEL as it keep playing game with me since it would come on and off back and forth..



But the guy could not scan anything out of my explorer, it kept coming back as "error" so the guy said that my explorer is just too old so it wont work on the scanner; it only works for newer vehicles.



I sort of dont believe that guy.. I think that it should work with my 95, but I could be wrong. I was hoping to be able to get the codes checked out so I can see if it is nothing serious as I am about to go on a 7 to 8 hour trip tonight to college.. But I guess I have to go on the trip without knowing whats wrong. Hope I make it lol.
 

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The 95 model was when OBDII began, and some early 95's are still the EECIV instead. Those don't scan with an OBDII scanner, but I thought that they also didn't have the OBDII port under the dash.



Anyway, the parts store scanners are often not the best, many times they cannot pull all of the codes from a PCM. They always get the common things, but there are hundreds of error codes, they miss some. I'd try using a different scanner, as well as finding out whether it is OBDII or not. Regards,
 

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When my '95 had the CEL going on and off randomly, it turned out to be the cam position sensor. Could be the same problem you have or it could be different. Sucks the '95 models had OBD-I ports.
 

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The '95s all had OBD1. There is a test connector under the hood by the power distribution box. You can jump two of the pins in there(not sure which) and it will blink out the code through the CEL.



They did have the OBDII port under the dash but from what I understand you can only pull information for the air bag system. For powertrain uses, it's worthless.
 

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Yes, I believe it was done in anticipation for MY 1996. The '95 is quite a hodge podge of new and old for Explorers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Interesting, so what is going to be my best bet to find out the codes? I dont want to buy a scanner just to find out what is up with my CEL..
 

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Little Googling never hurt anyone.



http://www.corral.net/tech/maintenance/eecivtest.html



One of the easiest ways to test the EEC-IV is to use the check engine light in the instrument cluster. This method is particularly handy because it requires no special tools and only a small jumper wire to perform the test. For simplicity's sake we will make our own jumper wire that you can store in your glove compartment.





TOOLS SECTION - Method Two

Wire Cutters

Wire Crimpers

4 inches of black 12 gauge wire

(2) Two 1/4" Crimp On Male Blade Plugs





First, cut a four inch section of black 12 gauge wire and strip 1/4" from each end. Next crimp a 1/4" male blade plug onto either end.

To read the codes output by the EEC-IV on your Check Engine light you will count the number of times the light flashes. Each flash of the Check Engine light is one pulse from the EEC-IV. For example if the light were to flash six times, then pause for one half second, then flash six more times this would indicate an error code 66. An error code 66 indicates that no mass air flow signal is present.
 

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I ran into the same problem on my buddy's '95 Camaro v-6. It had an OBD-II port but would read error when the scanner was hooked up. We figured it was still OBD-I at that point...
 

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When my '95 had the CEL going on and off randomly, it turned out to be the cam position sensor. Could be the same problem you have or it could be different. Sucks the '95 models had OBD-I ports.
1995 Fords use obd1, you need an obd1 scanner to read the codes.
 
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